LGBT+, LGBTQ, LGBTQIA: These acronyms refer to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer or Questioning, Intersex (previously known as hermaphrodite) and Asexual or Ally. Although all of the different identities within “LGBT” are often lumped together (and share sexism as a common root of oppression), there are specific needs and concerns related to each individual identity.

A pronoun is a word that refers to either the people talking (like I or you) or someone or something that is being talked about (like she, it, them, and this). Gender pronouns (like he and hers) specifically refer to people that you are talking about.
A gender pronoun is the pronoun that a person uses for themself, often referred to as a "pref
For example: If Alex’s pronouns are she, her, and hers, you could say “Alex ate her food because she was hungry.” You shouldn't assume someone's pronouns just by looking at them. Asking and correctly using someone’s personal pronoun is one of the most basic ways to show your respect for their gender identity. When someone is referred to with the wrong pronoun, it can make them feel disrespected, invalidated, dismissed, alienated, or dysphoric (or, often, all of the above.)

1) A gender expression that has elements of both masculinity and femininity; 2) Occasionally used in place of “intersex” to describe a person with both female and male anatomy.

a person with no (or very little) connection to the traditional system of gender, no personal alignment with the concepts of either man or woman, and/or someone who sees themselves as existing without gender. Sometimes called gender neutrois, gender neutral, or genderless.

A person who generally does not feel sexual attraction or desire to any group of people. Asexuality is not the same as celibacy.

Typically any non-LGBT person who supports and stands up for the rights of LGBT people, though LGBT people can be allies, such as a lesbian who is an ally to a transgender person.

A medical term used to refer to the chromosomal, hormonal and anatomical characteristics that are used to classify an individual as female or male or intersex. Often referred to as simply “sex,” “physical sex,” “anatomical sex,” or specifically as “sex assigned at birth.”

Aversion toward bisexuality and bisexual people as a social group or as individuals. People of any sexual orientation can experience such feelings of aversion. Biphobia is a source of discrimination against bisexuals, and may be based on negative bisexual stereotypes or irrational fear.

A curiosity about having attraction to people of the same gender/sex (similar to questioning).

A person who is attracted to both people of their own gender and another gender. Also called “bi”.

a person who identifies themselves as masculine, whether it be physically, mentally or emotionally. ‘Butch’ is sometimes used as a derogatory term for lesbians, but is also be claimed as an affirmative identity label.

Types of gender identity where an individual's experience of their own gender matches the sex they were assigned at birth.

The process of acknowledging one’s sexual orientation and/or gender identity to other people. For most LGBT people this is a life-long process.

Someone who wears clothes of another gender/sex.

Little or no capacity to experience sexual attraction until a strong romantic or emotional connection is formed with another individual, often within a romantic relationship.

Someone who performs masculinity theatrically.

Someone who performs femininity theatrically.

Abbreviation for female-to-male transgender or transsexual person; male-to-female transgender or transsexual person.

Derogatory term referring to a gay person, or someone perceived as queer.

A person who is attracted primarily to members of the same sex. Although it can be used for any sex (e.g. gay man, gay woman, gay person), “lesbian” is sometimes the preferred term for women who are attracted to women.

A term which refers to the ways in which we each manifest masculinity or femininity. It is usually an extension of our “gender identity,” our innate sense of being male, female, etc. Each of us expresses a particular gender every day – by the way we style our hair, select our clothing, or even the way we stand. Our appearance, speech, behavior, movement, and other factors signal that we feel – and wish to be understood – as masculine or feminine, or as a man or a woman.

The sense of “being” male, female, genderqueer, agender, etc. For some people, gender identity is in accord with physical anatomy. For transgender people, gender identity may differ from physical anatomy or expected social roles. It is important to note that gender identity, biological sex, and sexual orientation are separate and that you cannot assume how someone identifies in one category based on how they identify in another category.

1) A gender expression descriptor that indicates a non-traditional gender presentation (masculine woman or feminine man) 2) A gender identity label that indicates a person who identifies outside of the gender binary. Often abbreviated as “GNC.”

A term which refers to individuals or groups who “queer” or problematize the hegemonic notions of sex, gender and desire in a given society. Genderqueer people possess identities which fall outside of the widely accepted sexual binary (i.e. "men" and "women"). Genderqueer may also refer to people who identify as both transgendered AND queer, i.e. individuals who challenge both gender and sexuality regimes and see gender identity and sexual orientation as overlapping and interconnected.

The assumption, in individuals or in institutions, that everyone is heterosexual (e.g. asking a woman if she has a boyfriend) and that heterosexuality is superior to all other sexualities. Leads to invisibility and stigmatizing of other sexualities. Heteronormativity also leads us to assume that only masculine men and feminine women are straight.

Behavior that grants preferential treatment to heterosexual people, reinforces the idea that heterosexuality is somehow better or more “right” than queerness, and/or makes other sexualities invisible.

A person who is only attracted to members of the opposite sex. Also called “straight."

A range of negative attitudes and feelings toward homosexuality or people who are identified or perceived as being lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender (LGBT). It can be expressed as antipathy, contempt, prejudice, aversion, or hatred, may be based on irrational fear, and is sometimes related to religious beliefs.

A clinical term for people who are attracted to members of the same sex. Some people find this term offensive.

*Until 1973 “Homosexuality” was classified as a mental disorder in the DSM Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. This is just one of the reasons that there are such heavy negative and clinical connotations with this term.

A person whose sexual anatomy or chromosomes do not fit with the traditional markers
of "female" and "male." For example: people born with both "female" and "male" anatomy (penis,
testicles, vagina, uterus); people born with XXY.

Describes a person who keeps their sexual orientation or gender identity a secret
from some or all people.

A woman who is primarily attracted to other women.

1) An umbrella term sometimes used by LGBTQA people to refer to the entire LGBT
community. 2) An alternative that some people use to "queer" the idea of the labels & categories
such as lesbian, gay, bisexual, etc. Similar to the concept of genderqueer. It is important to note
that the word queer is an in-group term, and a word that can be considered offensive to some people, depending on their generation, geographic location, and relationship with the word.
For some, the process of exploring and discovering one's own sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression. Pansexual: A person who experiences sexual, romantic, physical, and/or spiritual attraction for members of all gender identities/expressions, not just people who fit into the standard gender binary (i.e. men and women).

The type of sexual, romantic, and/or physical attraction someone feels toward others. Often labeled based on the gender identity/expression of the person and who they are attracted to. Common labels: lesbian, gay, bisexual, pansexual, etc.

This term has many definitions. It is frequently used as an umbrella term to refer to all people who do not identify with their assigned gender at birth or the binary gender system. This includes transsexuals, cross-dressers, genderqueer, drag kings, drag queens, two-spirit people, and others. Some transgender people feel they exist not within one of the two standard gender categories, but rather somewhere between, beyond, or outside of those two genders. A trans* person can be straight, gay, bisexual, queer, or any other sexual orientation.

This term is primarily used to refer to the process a trans* person undergoes when changing their bodily appearance either to be more congruent with the gender/sex they feel themselves to be and/or to be in harmony with their preferred gender expression.

The fear or hatred of transgender people or gender non-conforming behavior. Like biphobia, transphobia can also exist among lesbian, gay, and bisexual people as well as among heterosexual people.

A person whose gender identity is different from their biological sex, who may undergo medical treatments to change their biological sex, often times to align it with their gender identity, or they may live their lives as another sex.

A person who dresses as the binary opposite gender expression (“cross- dresses”) for any one of many reasons, including relaxation, fun, and sexual gratification (often called a “cross-dresser,” and should not be confused with transsexual).

Is an umbrella term traditionally used by Native American people to recognize individuals who possess qualities or fulfill roles of both genders.

alternate pronouns that are gender neutral and preferred by some trans* people. They replace “he” and “she” and “his” and “hers” respectively. Alternatively some people who are not comfortable/do not embrace he/she use the plural pronoun “they/their” as a gender neutral singular pronoun.

Please Note

It is very important to respect people’s desired self-identifications. One should never assume another person’s identity based on that person’s appearance. It is always best to ask people how they identify, including what pronouns they prefer, and to respect their wishes

Local Resources

1644 Tiffin Ave Suite A
Findlay, OH 45840
Phone: 419-424-7441

Clinic offering:
HIV Testing
Rapid HIV Blood Testing
Rapid HIV Oral Testing
Hepatitis B Vaccine
HPV Vaccine

127 S Sandusky Ave Suite A
Upper Sandusky, OH 43351
Phone: 419-294-3852

Clinic offering:
Conventional HIV Blood Testing
Rapid HIV Blood Testing
Conventional HIV Oral Testing
Rapid HIV Oral Testing
Chlamydia Testing
Hepatitis B Vaccine
HPV Vaccine

175 W Franklin St Ste120
Kenton, OH 43326
Phone: 419-673-6230

Clinic offering:
HIV Testing
Rapid HIV Oral Testing
Hepatitis B Vaccine

71 S Washington St Suite 1102
Tiffin, OH 44883
Phone: 419-447-3691

Clinic offering:
HIV Testing
Conventional HIV Blood Testing
Conventional HIV Oral Testing
Hepatitis B Vaccine

219 E Market St
Lima, OH 45801
Phone: 419-228-4457

Clinic offering:
HIV Testing
Rapid HIV Oral Testing
Chlamydia Testing
Syphilis Testing
Gonorrhea Testing
Hepatitis B Testing

Other Local Resources

AIDS Resource Center Ohio Lima Region Office in Lima

http://www.youthaidscoalition.org/std-testing-in-findlay-oh.html

Urgent Care (two locations in Findlay)

Other Possible Resources

Equitas Health (formerly AIDS Resource Center Ohio) is a regional not-for-profit community-based healthcare system founded in 1984. Its expanded mission has made it one of the nation’s largest HIV/AIDS, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer/questioning (LGBTQ) healthcare organizations. With 15 offices in 11 cities, it serves more than 67,000 individuals in Ohio, Kentucky, and West Virginia each year through its diverse healthcare and social service delivery system focused around: primary and specialized medical care, dental services, behavioral health, HIV/STI prevention, advocacy, and community health initiatives. Equitas Health has locations in Lima, Toledo, Columbus, Dayton, Youngstown, Portsmouth, Newark, Mansfield, Canton, Akron, and Athens!

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (or PrEP) is when people at risk for HIV take daily medicines to lower their chances of getting infected. It is highly effective for preventing HIV if used as prescribed. Daily PrEP reduces the risk of getting HIV from sex by more than 90%. Among people who inject drugs, it reduces the risk by more than 70%.  OhioPrep is launching launching an smartphone app which will help you get a prescription for
PrEP without ever leaving you house! They will screen you, allow you to ask questions to a physician, bill your medical insurance and deliver your prescription right to your door. They even have a co-pay program.

Equality Ohio advocates and educates to achieve fair treatment and equal opportunity for all Ohioans regardless of their sexual orientation or gender identity or expression. Located in Columbus.

TransOhio serves the Ohio transgender and ally communities by providing services, education, support and advocacy, which promotes and improves the health, safety and life experience of Ohio transgender individuals and community. Located in Columbus.

  Stonewall Columbus is an LGBTQ community center that fights for tolerance, acceptance, and basic human rights for the LGBTQ community. Stonewall Columbus provides recovery groups, support groups, social groups, and classes

Gay and Lesbian Alliance against Defamation (GLAAD) is a national media force that is the forefront of cultural change and increasing the acceptance for the LGBTQ community.

The LGBTQ Task Force advocates for freedom, justice, and equality for the LGBTQ community. The Task Force trains and mobilizes millions of activists to end discrimination for LGBTQ people.

Youth & Suicide

Lesbian, gay and bisexual youth are up to 9 times more likely to commit suicide. That number only rises for transgender individuals, it is estimated that 40% of the trans community will attempt suicide. Suicide for LGBTQ youth is directly linked to family support. It's important to watch out for warning signs like:

Appearing sad or depressed, talking or writing about suicide, withdrawing from family and friends, feeling helpless or hopeless, experiencing dramatic mood changes, abusing drugs or alcohol, acting impulsively, experiencing a change in sleeping habits, performing poorly at school or work, giving away prized possessions or exhibiting a change in personality.

What should you do if you think a loved one might hurt themself? Ask. Take their answer seriously. Stay positive. Ask how you can help. Call 911 if you have to.

Understanding LGBT+ Youth

By understanding the intricate progression lesbian and gay persons go through during identity development you are then able to better understand their actions, thoughts and needs. The Cass Identity Model is one of the fundamental and most widely accepted psychological theories of gay and lesbian identity development, which was established in 1979 by Vivienne Cass. Though it is often viewed as a linear model, individuals may not begin at stage one and they may not end on stage six. It’s important to recognize that individuals may be going through any stage at any time and frequently teeter from one phase to another based upon their surroundings and distinct circumstances.

Identity Confusion

This is the "Who am I?" stage associated with the feeling that one is different from peers, accompanied by a growing sense of personal alienation. The person begins to be conscious of same-sex feelings or behaviors and to label them as such. It is rare at this stage for the person to disclose inner turmoil to others.

Identity Comparison

This is the rationalization or bargaining stage where the person thinks, "I may be a homosexual, but then again I may be bisexual," "Maybe this is just temporary," or, "My feelings of attraction are simply for just one other person of my own sex and this is a special case." There is a heightened sense of not belonging anywhere with the corresponding feeling that "I am the only one in the world like this." This stage can be dangerous. A person typically does not divulge information reguarding these feelings to others, but, if stage two is managed well then an individual moves onto stage three. A person may experience self-hatred and an increased risk of self harm if they are unable to work through this stage and move onto the next.

Identity Tolerance

In this "I probably am" stage, the person begins to contact other lgbt people to counteract feelings of isolation and alienation, but merely tolerates rather than fully accepts a gay or lesbian identity. The feeling of not belonging with heterosexuals becomes stronger. Positive contacts can have the effect of making other gay and lesbian people appear more significant and more positive to the person at this stage, leading to a more favorable sense of self and a greater commitment to a homosexual self-identity.

Identity Synthesis

There is continued and increased contact with other gay and/or lesbian people in this stage, where friendships start to form. The individual thus evaluates other lesbian and gay people more positively and accepts rather than merely tolerates a lesbian or gay self-image. The earlier questions of "Who am I?" and "Where do I belong?" have been answered. Coping strategies for handling incongruity at this stage include continuing to pass as heterosexual, and limiting contacts with heterosexuals who threaten to increase incongruity (e.g. some family members and/or peers). The person can also selectively disclose a homosexual identity to significant heterosexuals.

Identity Pride

This is the "These are my people" stage where the individual develops an awareness of the enormous incongruity that exists between the person's increasingly positive concept of self as lesbian or gay and an awareness of society's rejection of this orientation. The person feels anger at heterosexuals and devalues many of their institutions (e.g. marriage, gender-role structures, etc.) The person discloses her or his identity to more and more people and wishes to be immersed in the gay or lesbian subculture consuming its literature, art, and other forms of culture. For some at this stage, the combination of anger and pride energizes the person into action against perceived homophobia producing an "activist."

Identity Acceptance

The intense anger at heterosexuals -- the "them and us" attitude that may be evident in stage 5 -- softens at this stage to reflect a recognition that some heterosexuals are supportive and can be trusted. However, those who are not supportive are further devalued. There remains some anger at the ways that lesbians and gays are treated in this society, but this is less intense. The person retains a deep sense of pride but now comes to perceive less of a opposition between the heterosexual and gay and lesbian communities. A lesbian or gay identity becomes an integral and integrated aspect of the individual's complete personality structure.

LGBTQ+ Youth Statistics

  • The rate of suicide attempts is 4 times greater for LGB youth and those who come from highly rejecting families are 8.4 times as likely to have attempted suicide.
  • 1 out of 4 youth that become homeless each year are LGBT. 1 in 3 teens on the street will be approched for prostitution within 48 hours of leaving home.
  • While non-LGBT students struggle most with school classes, exams, and work, their LGBT peers say the biggest problem they face is unaccepting families.
  • Only 12% of Sex-Ed classes covered same-sex relationships according to a survey in 2015. Much of the sexual health information online is neither age-appropriate nor medically accurate.
  • A staggering 51% of students reported hearing homophobic remarks from their teachers or other school staff. That number increases to 55.5% in regards to gender expression.
  • Conversion Therapy is still legal in Ohio. Methods include electrocution, starvation and mental, physical and sexual abuse. Lobotomies on LGBT individuals were common practice prior to 1981.

Helpful Organizations

Every day, The Trevor Project saves young lives through its accredited, free and confidential phone, instant message and text messaging crisis intervention services. A leader and innovator in suicide prevention, The Trevor Project offers the largest safe social networking community for LGBTQ youth, best practice suicide prevention educational training, resources for youth and adults, and advocacy initiatives.

Family Resource Center of Northwest Ohio is licensed by the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (OhioMHAS) and has received national accreditation by the Council on Accreditation (COA).
This agency serves all Patients regardless of inability to pay. FRC accepts Medicaid, insurance, client pay and subsidies for essential services are offered based on family size and income.

Kaleidoscope Youth Center is the only organization in Ohio solely dedicated to supporting LGBTQ youth and their allies. Founded in 1994, Kaleidoscope is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit organization.  The mission of Kaleidoscope Youth Center is to work in partnership with young people in Central Ohio to create safe and empowering environments for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning and ally youth through advocacy, education, support, and community engagement.

Spectrum Family and Friend Support is a peer-led support group that is here to provide a safe and empowering place for family members and friends with LGBT+ loved ones to meet, talk and learn from others that are going through (or have already gone through) similar life circumstances. Our goal is to help facilitate a healthy and supportive relationship between family members, friends, and their LGBT+ loved ones. SFFS meets in Findlay, Ohio and welcomes all – parents, friends, family and youth.

Huckleberry House works with Central Ohio’s youth and families who are dealing with some of the most difficult problems imaginable. Issues like abuse, violence, neglect, poverty, and homelessness. No matter how hopeless the situation may seem, we offer proven programs and committed people who know how to help young people and families take control of their lives. So they can move past the circumstances they’re in, and move toward the future they want. Columbus, Ohio.

Uniting people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) with families, friends, and allies, PFLAG is committed to advancing equality through its mission of support, education, and advocacy. PFLAG has 400 chapters and 200,000 supporters crossing multiple generations of American families in major urban centers, small cities, and rural areas in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. There is a chapter in Lima, Columbus, Dayton and Lorain.

Harvey House is a drop-in center, community center, and safe space for LGBTQ+ youth and their allies. We are the first and only LGBTQ+ community center in Northwest Ohio. Find out how you can contribute to the future of someone in need through donations of money and time. Toledo, Ohio.

Focus on Friends provides peer-led support and resources to help people improve their health and wellness, live a self-directed life, and sustain their recovery. FOF has many support groups including narcotics anonymous, heroin anonymous, cocaine anonymous, gamblers anonymous, an LGBT support group and other programs, including a drop in center on Trenton.

Spectrum Family and Friend Support is a peer-led support group that is here to provide a safe place for family members with LGBT+ loved ones to meet, talk and learn from others that are going through (or have already gone through) similar life circumstances. Our goal is to facilitate a supportive relationship between family members and their LGBT+ loved ones. SFFS meets on the last Wednesday of every month at Journey @ Christ Church on Bigelow Ave.

Download Minor Permission Slip

Open Air is a support group for the LGBT+ Community, Friends, Family and Allies. Open air likes to provide a relaxing atmosphere for all to openly discuss their struggles, aspirations or even their day-to-day lives. Possible Conversation Starters: Support, Recovery, Self-Acceptance, Discloser/coming out, Addiction, Gender, Social Issues, Mental Health or Trauma. Open Air is for individuals age 16 and up.
Open Air meets the First and Third Friday of every month at Focus on Friends, which is located on Trenton Avenue.

United is the University of Findlay's Gay-Straight Alliance. They aim to foster positive relationships between students of all orientations and gender identity. United would like to educate their campus and community about tolerance and acceptance, and serve the community and the student body. United is not exclusively for UF students and welcomes all individuals to their meetings, which has been known to push 40 attendees. United meets every other Tuesday at the UF's Social Work house.

First Christian Church – Disciples of Christ

1624 Suite B Tiffin Ave
Findlay, OH 45840

Telephone: (419) 422-5615

Family Resource Center of Northwest Ohio is licensed by the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (OhioMHAS) and has received national accreditation by the Council on Accreditation (COA).This agency serves all Patients regardless of inability to pay. FRC accepts Medicaid, insurance; client pay and subsidies for essential services are offered based on family size and income.

Century Health is a private, non-profit agency. They provide treatment for mental health and substance abuse. They offer a continuum of services including outpatient and residential services. Century Health accepts most health insurance plans, Medicaid, Medicare, and flexible payment plans.

Blanchard Valley Health Systems is a non-profit, regional health system that serves eight different counties including, Hancock, Allen, Putnam, Henry, Wood, Seneca, Wyandot and Hardin Counties. BVHS provide a variety of services like behavioral health, outpatient services, rehabilitation, therapy, surgery, etc.

NAMI’s mission is to improve the quality of life by promoting mental health, eliminating the stigma, and providing support and education. NAMI offers support, education, and advocacy to anyone with a mental illness along with their families, friends, caregivers, and anyone else who is interested

ADAMHS works to meet the mental health and substance abuse needs of their community neighbors, friends, and families. The ADAMHS purpose is to plan, monitor, and fund mental health and alcohol/drug recovery services to the residents of Hancock County. They provide prevention and wellness programs, crisis services, treatment services, and recovery supports, including housing, employment supports, and peer supports.

Equitas Health (formerly AIDS Resource Center Ohio) is a regional not-for-profit community-based healthcare system founded in 1984. Its expanded mission has made it one of the nation’s largest HIV/AIDS, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer/questioning (LGBTQ) healthcare organizations. With 15 offices in 11 cities, it serves more than 67,000 individuals in Ohio, Kentucky, and West Virginia each year through its diverse healthcare and social service delivery system focused around: primary and specialized medical care, dental services, behavioral health, HIV/STI prevention, advocacy, and community health initiatives. The Equitas Health Lima office provides supportive HIV/AIDS services for individuals living in the following counties: Allen, Auglaize, Champaign, Hancock, Hardin, Logan, Mercer, Paulding, Putnam, Shelby, Van Wert

658 W. Market St., Suite 202
Lima OH, 45801
(419) 222-0827

Every day, The Trevor Project saves young lives through its accredited, free and confidential phone, instant message and text messaging crisis intervention services. A leader and innovator in suicide prevention, The Trevor Project offers the largest safe social networking community for LGBTQ youth, best practice suicide prevention educational training, resources for youth and adults, and advocacy initiatives.

Other Resources

The Human Rights Campaign represent more than 3 million members and supporters nationwide who envision a world where LGTBQ people are embraces as full members of society at home, work, and all communities

The mission of GLAD is to create a society free of discrimination based on gender identity and expression, HIV status, and sexual orientation.

GLSEN’s mission is to create safe and affirming schools for all students, regardless of their sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression. It was created to improve the educational system from LGBTQ students because too often, students were bullied and discriminated against.

Uniting people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) with families, friends, and allies, PFLAG is committed to advancing equality through its mission of support, education, and advocacy. PFLAG has 400 chapters and 200,000 supporters crossing multiple generations of American families in major urban centers, small cities, and rural areas in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. There is a chapter in Lima, Columbus, Dayton and Lorain.

Legal Resources

It is currently legal to be fired from your job, denied an apartment, or refused service at a movie theater, restaurant or hotel because of your sexual orientation or gender identity in Ohio. In many cities and counties in Ohio and for many government employees, these practices are prohibited, but there are no statewide nondiscrimination protections that protect all Ohioans, and Findlay remains unproteted. Right now 22 of the 50 states currently protect people from discrimination based on their sexual orientation and/or gender identity, putting Ohio at a competitive disadvantage for recruiting and hiring the best and brightest professional talent.  Many employers across the country and here in Ohio have extended nondiscrimination policies to cover LGBT people, but millions of Ohioans remain unprotected.  Protections are needed for everyone.

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